Footprints/Mounting Standards on Red Dot Sights

Introduction

With every passing year, more red dot sights are available on the market. There have never been as many optics manufacturers as there are now, which means that there have never been as many different optical devices as there are now.

Red Dot Sights

Red Dot Sights

Red dot sights have been steadily gaining in popularity – for this reason, they can be found in the offer of most manufacturers of optics around the world. Even companies such as Kahles and Leica, who haven’t manufactured red dot sights before, have recently launched their own versions.

In this article, the most common footprints/mounting standards used on red dot sights are listed. Each standard is described and an image of it is added. At the end of each section, red dot sights that use the footprint discussed are listed.

 

Docter/Noblex standard

This is one of the most widely used footprints in the field of red dot sights. It has two holes for screws and four sockets in which the pins on the mount/adapter fit, one in each corner. There is a wide range of mounts for this footprint on the market, which is one of the main reasons why it is used by so many manufacturers. Docter/Noblex standard is simple and reliable.

Red dot sights that share this footprint:

* These red dot sights have a Docter/Noblex footprint, but the adapter supplied with them has wider threaded sockets than adapters suited for a Docter/Noblex footprint. Consequently, thicker screws are enclosed. You can mount these red dots on an adapter designed specifically for the Docter/Noblex footprint, but you will need not be able to use the screws supplied with them – thinner screws are needed.

Docter, Noblex footprint

Docter, Noblex footprint on Noblex Sight II+

Docter, Noblex footprint

Docter, Noblex footprint on Leica Tempus

Docter Sight footprint

Docter Sight footprint

Note: distances between holes (sockets) are measured from and to the center of the hole (socket).

Important notes

Meopta Meosight III uses a footprint that is very similar to the one used by Docter. The four sockets, one in each corner, are in the exact same places. The holes for the screws, however, are not. This is why Meopta Meosight III cannot be mounted on every adapter designed for the Docter/Noblex footprint. Several adapters are designed so that both Docter/Noblex footprint sights and Meopta Meosight III can be mounted on them (see the image below).

Meopta Meosight III (above) and Docter Sight C (below) (source: Christian S.)

Meopta Meosight III (above) and Docter Sight C (below) (source: Christian S.)

Meopta Meosight III (above) and Docter Sight C (below) (source: Christian S.)

Meopta Meosight III (above) and Docter Sight C (below) (source: Christian S.)

Various adapters for the Docter/Noblex footprint (for different pistols) (source: Christian S.)

Various adapters for the Docter/Noblex footprint (for different pistols) (source: Christian S.)

 

Aimpoint Micro standard

Aimpoint is the first company to have used this standard on their Micro small tube sights. Today, other manufacturers of this type of sights use it as well. The surface of the footprint is slightly lifted in the middle – on each side of the lifted section, there are two holes for screws. The lifted section is cut in the middle – this is where the recoil stop fits.

Red dot sights that share this footprint:

Aimpoint Micro footprint

Aimpoint Micro footprint

Aimpoint Micro footprint

Aimpoint Micro footprint

Note: distances between holes (sockets) are measured from and to the center of the hole (socket).

Important notes

GPO Spectra uses a footprint that is identical to the one used by Aimpoint Micro. Even though it appears to be the same at first sight, there is a protruding part underneath the illumination knob. Because of it, the adapters designed for an Aimpoint Micro footprint do not fit into place at that side (check the picture below). GPO Spectra uses a unique adapter with narrow side sections.

GPO Spectra and its footprint (right) next to Aimpoint Micro H-2 and its footprint (left)

GPO Spectra and its footprint (right) next to Aimpoint Micro H-2 and its footprint (left)

An adapter designed for GPO Spectra's footprint (right) next to the adapter designed for Aimpoint Micro's footprint (left)

An adapter designed for GPO Spectra’s footprint (right) next to the adapter designed for Aimpoint Micro’s footprint (left)

An adapter designed for GPO Spectra's footprint

An adapter designed for GPO Spectra’s footprint

GPO Spectra footprint

GPO Spectra footprint

C-more standard

This is a standard found on C-more’s popular red dot sights, RTS and STS. Some other manufacturers also use it because of its simplicity and reliability. The footprint has two holes for screws and two sockets in which the pins on the mount/adapter fit.

Red dot sights that share this footprint:

C-more footprint

C-more footprint

C-more footprint

C-more footprint

Note: distances between holes (sockets) are measured from and to the center of the hole (socket).

Shield standard

Shield sights are incredibly compact, which is why Shield had to come up with a footprint of their own. It is designed similarly to the Noblex/Docter footprint (there are two holes for the screws and four sockets in which the notches on the mount/adapter fit, one in each corner). The sockets, however, are a little bit wider and closer one to another.

Red dot sights that share this footprint:

Shield footprint

Shield footprint

Docter, Noblex footprint (top) and Shield footprint (bottom)

Docter, Noblex footprint (top) and Shield footprint (bottom)

Shield Sight footprint

Shield Sight footprint

Note: distances between holes (sockets) are measured from and to the center of the hole (socket).

 

A modification of the Shield standard

Holosun 407K and Holosun 507K feature a modification of the Shield footprint. The differences are:

  • the two rear sockets are missing
  • the sockets in the front are shallower

For this reason, some pistols that are optic ready for Shield footprint need to be modified for the 407 and 507K. Namely, the two rear indexing lugs on the pistol have to be removed and the two front indexing lugs shortened in height. Hellcat and Walther PPS are examples of such pistols (some pistols, such as Sig Sauer P365XL, do not have to be modified).

Holosun 407K and 507K footprint

Holosun 407K and 507K footprint

 ‘Trijicon RMR’ standard

This footprint has two holes for screws and two sockets in which the pins on the mount/adapter fit – these are in the front, in each corner. Even though the sockets are in the front only, the footprint is somewhat reminiscent of the Docter/Noblex one. Note, however, that the sockets in the corners are farther apart on the Trijicon footprint and bigger in diameter.

Red dot sights that share this footprint:

Trijicon RMR footprint

Trijicon RMR footprint

Trijicon RMR footprint

Trijicon RMR footprint

Note: distances between holes (sockets) are measured from and to the center of the hole (socket).

There are many other, unique footprints on the market. Sig Sauer’s Romeo 1, for example, has a footprint suitable for mounting on certain Sig Sauer pistols – you will need a special adapter if you wish to mount it elsewhere. Steiner uses a different approach for their MRS – there are only two narrow notches in the front, while the holes for the screws are located at the rear of the sight, on both sides, left and right.

‘Trijicon MRO’ standard

There are four screw holes on the footprint, two in the front, two in the rear. The holes on the left are separated from the holes on the right with a lifted section in the middle.

Red dot sights that share this footprint:

  • Trijicon MRO
  • Trijicon MRO Patrol

Trijicon MRO footprint

A modification of the ‘Trijicon MRO’ footprint

Vector Optics Centurion 1×30 features a modification of the ‘Trijicon MRO’ footprint. The distances between the screw holes are the same, and so is the thread. The difference is in the lifted section. On Centurion, the middle part of the lifted section is cut out to create space for a recoil stop. For this reason, a mount designed for the Trijicon MRO footprint fits on the Centurion, while a mount designed for the Vector Optics Centurion (with a recoil stop) does not fit on the MRO (the middle part of the lifted section is not cut out).

Vector Optics Centurion 1x30 Footprint

Vector Optics Centurion 1×30 Footprint

Red dot sights that have a unique footprint

Sig Sauer Romeo 1 Footprint

Sig Sauer Romeo 1 Footprint

Steiner MRS footprint

Steiner MRS footprint

Holosun Paralow HS403 A footprint

Holosun Paralow HS403 A footprint

Aimpoint ACRO footprint

Aimpoint ACRO footprint

Aimpoint Acro footprint

Aimpoint Acro footprint

Note: distances between holes (sockets) are measured from and to the center of the hole (socket).

This article will be constantly updated in the future. With it, we wish to create a collection of useful data that will be of great help to users/potential buyers of red dot sights and those who are looking for a specific mount/adapter for their red dot sight. If you have a compact reflex or small tube sight that isn’t listed in this article, please be so kind as to send a picture of the sight and its footprint to andraz.gradisnik@optics-trade.comhelp us expand our database. We greatly appreciate everyone’s help!

Picture gallery

 

Summary
Footprints on red dot sights
Article Name
Footprints on red dot sights
Description
In this article, the most common footprints/mounting standards used on red dot sights are listed. Each standard is described and an image of it is added.
Author
Optics Info
Optics Info
Optics Info

25 thoughts on “Footprints/Mounting Standards on Red Dot Sights”

  1. Mounted the Holosun 507c on G45 MOS. Perfect fit with zero play and 6 lbs of tork using Blue Loktite. EDC weapon and must train on presentations but have used the Venom for a few years without issue. Right handed but blind in right eye and left eye now not able to focus on FSP. Put off the red dot fad until last year. Not a fad and much easier and faster than irons. Always keep irons on weapon as backup. Train as mush as possible at dot acquisition from your EDC holster.

  2. Just receive my canik elite subcompact with optic ready . I was interested on getting a red dot optic but dont know which one I should go with. I know I want to try and stay around the 200 dollars range so any help would be appreciated. Thank you

  3. This may seem like a dumb question but is it pretty well confirmed that the Holosun 507K and the Shield RMSc share the same footprint? I’m seeing a lot of slide milling companies that don’t have 507K on their website yet but they do have Shield RMSc so I’m assuming if they’re the same it’s safe to order that and it would still be compatible with the Holosun 507K. Thanks for your help.

    1. Dave,

      sorry for the late reply.

      The footprint is not exactly the same. 407K/507K feature a modification of the Shield SMS/RMS footprint, which means that some handguns will have to be slightly modified for these red dot sights to fit.

      More information is already available in the article (it has been updated).

  4. Andraž,

    Per your article, 507k and DDP have the same footprint, and the Sig Romeo 1 Pro should have the same footprint as the DPP. So will the Holosun 507k install directly on a Sig P320 Xcompact?

    1. Dear Marcus,

      From what I’ve heard, Sig Sauer Romeo 1 Pro should have the same footprint as Leupold DPP (the standard DPP has a unique footprint).

      As 407K/507K feature a modification of the Shield RMS/SMS footprint, it would be best to contact Sig Sauer directly and inquire whether any modifications to the handgun are necessary.

  5. This is an awesome source of info; I did however find a discrepancy with the shield standard and the holosun 407k/507k optics. On the optic body, there are no recesses for the rear posts, so those will have to be removed in order to accommodate that particular optic.

    1. Dear Matt,

      thank you very much for your comment.

      Yes, we received the first 407K/507K sights on Friday and found out that two sockets are missing at the back. The recesses in the front appear to be shorter, too. I have just updated the article.

  6. Thank you for putting this resource together! I’ve referred to it multiple times as I’ve purchased red dots for several pistols over the past 6-8 months.

    I have a question I’m hoping you or a reader might be able to answer: does the Vortex Viper and Burris FastFire 4 share the exact same footprint? I ask because I have a slide that’s milled for a Vortex Viper but I want to replace the Viper with the FastFire. However since the slide was milled for the Vortex and fits it exactly I’m not sure that the FastFire will fit the milled area. It looks like the front of the FastFire is curved more than the Viper, but I can’t find any footprint schematics that provide a definitive answer.

    1. I am glad to hear that the article has been of help to you as this is its main purpose.

      We still haven’t received a Burris Fastfire 4 to check its footprint. I’ve heard several times from multiple sources that it has a Docter footprint, but I can’t confirm that until I see the footprint personally and do all the measurements.

      It will surely be added to the article as soon as we get it.

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